frida kahlo

(1907-1954)
 

Where to start.  Frida Kahlo is one of my favorite
artists.  She was way ahead of her time.  She
was born in Mexico in 1907.  She suffered a lot
of emotional and physical pain in her life.  She
contracted polio when she was five, and was in
a bus accident when she was a teenager that
left her badly injured and bedridden.  This is
when she began her interest in art.  Most of her
works are self-portraits, but she also has many
works that she used to express her pain.  Her
turbulent marriage to revolutionary Mexican
artist Diego Rivera is also a prominent theme in
her work.

              

 

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carleton watkins

(1829-1916)

I first saw Watkins' work at an exhibit in D.C.  I
truly like his nature photography.  After being
jazzed from his "old school" exhibit, I was given
as a gift the book Carleton Watkins:  The Art of
Perception.  I've really enjoyed it.  I have a few
small prints of his works hanging up at home.  
They are all black and white, naturally.  A good
web site to check out has his works from
Yosemite.  

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Jerry uelsmann

(1934-  )

Jerry Uelsmann was born in Detroit in 1934.  He
received his B.F.A. Degree at the Rochester
Institute of Technology in 1957 and his M.S. And
M.F.A. At Indiana University in 1960.  He teaches
photography at the University of Florida.  His
work has been exhibited in more than 100
shows in the U.S. and abroad over the last 30+
years.

On his technique:

“Usually I run through fifty sheets of paper
during a darkroom day.  I always hope that at
the end of the day, I will have produced one or
two images that I care about.  I make a small
edition of each of these, usually six prints.  Over
the years I have discovered that approximately
10 percent of my finished images survive.  This
means that out of a year's work, during which I
produce approximately 150 images, about
fifteen of them have a lasting value for me...
When I look at my contact sheets I try to find
clues to things that may work, clipping possible
combinations together as I flounder.  I
sometimes make little sketches and then begin
by trying to build the image that was initially
perceived at the point of making the sketch.”

Sources:

Uelsmann, Jerry.  Photo Synthesis, 1992; and
Process and Perception, 1985.

Click here to go to a web page of his
masterworks.

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